Join CoRe and Mediate BC at the Vancouver Fringe Festival!

For several years, I’ve encouraged conflict resolution professionals to seek opportunities to view live theatre, and to engage in reflection on the conflict resolution elements these shows offer. In particular, Fringe Festivals offer an incredible opportunity to see new theatre and hear new voices inexpensively. This year, I’ve taken on a new role with the Vancouver Fringe Festival – president of the Board of Directors – and so am enthusiastically encouraging friends and colleagues to join me at the Festival!

The Vancouver Fringe runs September 6 – 16 at venues on Granville Island and in East Vancouver. With 99 shows to choose from, there really is something for everyone: but it can be tough to choose! For that reason, I’m encouraging as many conflict resolution professionals as possible to join me for one specific show that I expect to be of broad interest:

Rocko and Nakota: Tales from the Land

Saturday, September 8th, 3:00 pm. at the Waterfront Theatre, Granville Island

ConRes folx who come out that day are invited to join me for drinks and debrief at the Vancouver Fish Company following the show.

Why Rocko and Nakota?

One of the great strengths of live theatre is its ability to offer a glimpse into others’ perspectives – something that, of course, can increase empathy, and may well increase understanding. Similarly, live theatre offers us the opportunity to experience storytelling traditions outside the oddly linear and adversarial storytelling tradition that often develops in a mediation or litigation practice.

Josh-Languedoc-presents-Rocko-and-Nakota-at-the-Victoria-Fringe Written and performed by Josh Languedoc, Rocko and Nakota has been described as bringing Anishinaabe stories to life “with respect and passion”. Languedoc describes his show as “ideal for anyone who has battled with their own health or cultural identity, or anyone interested in indigenous issues”*. During its run at the Winnipeg Fringe in June, Francis Concan of the Winnipeg Free Press wrote: For those who are intimidated by theatre that doesn’t centre on whiteness, here is a moving show that invites you to learn more about Indigenous culture and storytelling

What else should I see?

When you buy one ticket ($15) to a Fringe show, you’ll also buy a membership (a one time fee of $7). So you may just want to make use of that membership to see more than one show! Here’s a few others you might want to think about seeing:

I’m booked to see at least 35 plays over the course of the Fringe, so I’ll be able to speak to lots of shows if you’re curious and looking for advice. And one of the joys of Fringe theatre everywhere is the chance to get incredibly helpful reviews from fellow Festival goers in each and every line-up. Many of the folx around you will be seeing even more shows than me, and will be more than happy to share ideas about what you might like: fringe festivals are definitely places that invites their audiences to share and engage!

See you at the Fringe!

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